Women's Avant Garde Couture Collection

Spring/Summer 2020

This collection was inspired by the patterns found in trees, in hopes to inspire people to have a much deeper appreciation for something we are surrounded by - the very essence of what keeps us alive. These patterns included: vein structure in leaves, geometric patterns of bark, and the interlocking of the root system. The target for the collection is for the couture, themed designs of the Met Gala - a yearly event on the first Monday in May at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Through much 3D draping and research, Mason used the fabrics in unconventional ways to create new and striking silhouettes. 

Credits:

Model: Lindsey Williams

Photographer: Ryan Kelly

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Orange Smocked Dress

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Rustic Red Dress

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Blue Bark Jacket

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Leafy Orange Dress

This dress was inspired by the interlocking of roots. The iridescent fabric allowed for a play on the orange-yellow threads that created this textile. The use of smocking coupled with the idea of the fibbonachi sequence allowed for the exponential growth of the size of the smocking from the shoulder down to the train.

Inspired by the veins in leaves, this dress truly takes fashion to the next level. Large, structured leaves protrude from the one-shoulder bodice, as hundreds of folded pieces of fabric cascade down the dress - creating the illusion of leaves. The dress would surely be an eye-turner at the Met Gala - it's intended location to be showcased.

Days of work went into constructing the fragile work of the sleeves and jacket. Using water-soluble interfacing, Mason created a remarkable new textile by cutting individual squares, sewing them together on the interfacing, then sewing them to the jacket. The intention was to showcase the geometric nature of bark.

Similarly to the red dress, Mason wanted to give a nod to the fascination he found in "a tree that is full of leaves being blown by the wind." Obtaining the textile, he went to work to create a bubble dress silhouette with a cocktail length. He added the sash and side-train of fabric to further exemplify this movement and flow of the tree.